Deirdre O’Neill: Why are there so few female sports writers?

Deirdre O’Neill: Why are there so few female sports writers?

We all know that most sports journalists are men. However, in recent years, female sports broadcasters have increased their visibility. By comparison, while newspaper sports coverage has increased rapidly in recent years Deirdre O’Neill, University of Huddersfield, looks at the progress made by women sports writers. [Image: Jon Candy / Flickr] Sports journalism – online, in broadcasting and in print - is flourishing. Much of top-level sport is big business and top athletes have a celebrity status, with all the attendant coverage. For newspapers in particular, sports coverage has expanded exponentially, and in a competitive market, is arguably the driving force behind the battle for circulation and building a loyal readership. According to the Chief Football Correspondent of the Times, Oliver Kay, “The number of pages of sport has gone up overall. Football dominates, at about 50% of the Times and probably around 70% for the red-tops. You could ask why newspapers are force- feeding us football, but all the research...
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Researcher in computational journalism required

Dr. Neil Thurman of Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich is seeking a doctoral or post doctoral researcher in the area of computational journalism. He says: "I'm hiring a 3-year post-doc to work with me on a project on computational journalism / algorithmic news. The position is based in my new department at the University of Munich, Germany. Native English speakers are welcome to apply."   The position focuses how computational processes are increasingly replacing journalists’ editorial and reporting functions and the impact this is having on individual news consumers, the journalism profession, and society at large. The post-holder will collect evidence about how algorithmic processes increasingly: determine which news stories get covered (through news detection); actually write news content (through news creation); format the news the public gets to see (through news packaging); and filter and prioritize news for individuals (via news distribution and discovery). Full details can be found... here Deadline - asap!    ...
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New site for EU student scholarships

We have been notified of a non-profit EU-funded student finance portal European Funding Guide (www.european-funding-guide.eu). The platform helps students in 16 EU countries access more than 12,000 scholarship programs and other forms of financial aid, worth a total of 27 billion Euros. Financial difficulties are still the number one reason for students aborting or never even starting a higher education course and this new portal aims to help. The portal has researched and categorized over 12,000 scholarships, grants and awards across the whole EU worth more than 27 billion Euros per year. The platform is completely free of charge and can be used by students at the bachelor, masters and doctoral level. The site also includes information about scholarships (for example, the most common myths, such as:  not all scholarships are granted on a merit or need-base) with the help of currently more than 6,880 supporters....
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Lecturer in media ethics attacks Robin Williams reporting

Dr Douglas Chalmers, senior lecturer in media and journalism at Glasgow Caledonian University, has attacked the reporting of Robin Williams' death. In an article for The Drum he writes: The details of how he carried out his suicide reported in a lurid manner – sometimes in bulletpoint headlines – by papers such as the Sun, the Mirror, and the Mail are of no positive benefit to anyone. They also run the risk of bringing about copycat actions by individuals who perhaps may feel seriously depressed or have mental health issues. At worst this might bring them to act in a similar way in the belief that this could bring about a personal association with their former on-screen hero.   There exists very clear guidelines produced by the NUJ which outline acceptable ways of covering suicide in the press. It states: “Reporting suicide carries a responsibility for writers and editors in regard to the most vulnerable and exposed members of society. It is essential to understand the serious implications...
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Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Female Conservative and Labour politicians receive more negative media coverage than their male counterparts, while female Liberal Democrats were generally ignored, new research has found. Research by Leeds Trinity journalism academic Deirdre O’Neill and partly funded by a grant from the AJE,  was hailed as an ‘important’ work by Mary Mcleod MP in her opening remarks to an All-Party Parliamentary Group on Sex Equality examining media coverage of women in politics. Ms O’Neill, Associate Principal Lecturer in Journalism, and co-author Dr Heather Savigny of Bournemouth University, were presenting their findings on press coverage of female politicians over the last 20 years, in a session organised by the Fawcett Society. Their work showed that women in 2012 were receiving less coverage in proportion to their relative numbers in Parliament than in 2002 and 1992, and that they were being quoted less than 20 years ago. The research also demonstrated that Conservative and Labour women were receiving proportionally more negative coverage than their male counterparts...
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