AJE seminar examines sexism in journalism

AJE seminar examines sexism in journalism

Speakers at the AJE Spring Seminar 2015 described how sexism is still present in newsrooms and urged j-schools to train students to proactively deal with it. The seminar included academics: Angela Phillips (Goldsmiths), Suzanne Franks (City) and Sarah Niblock (Brunel). They were joined by new journalists Dina Rickman (Independent) and Sarah Graham (freelance) who recently graduated from City. A minute's silence out of respect for those killed at Charlie Hebdo in Paris was also held. #JeSuisCharlie. While this (male) writer naively hoped that things were improving, speakers gave examples of sexist comments and chauvinism in workplaces and journalistic output. The seminar heard how abuse can be experienced by female journalists, academics as well as students. Although women make up the majority of journalism students, men often hold the most senior positions in newsrooms. A speaker criticised some national newspapers for not being particularly family-friendly places to work. This resulted in the industry losing many talented female journalists. It highlighted how newspaper output still contained...
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Complete list of speakers

Complete list of speakers

AJE Spring Seminar, University of Sunderland Canary Wharf campus Friday January 9, 2015.   9.30 am    Registration and coffee 10.00 am    Welcome to Sunderland University, London campus. 10.05am     Welcome from AJE. 10.10       Academic papers (2 x 20 min papers and 15-20 min discussion). Claire Wolfe, University of Worcester, ‘Women in business: an analysis of the portrayal of visual imagery used in the business and finance sections of newspapers.’ Deirdre O’Neill, University of Huddersfield, ‘Female politicians in the British press: the exception to the “masculine” norm?’ 11.10      Coffee and tea 11.30       Academic papers (2 x 20 min papers and 15-20 min discussion). Sarah Niblock, Brunel University, ‘”He just snapped”: gendered narratives of family annihilation in the UK press.’ Amanda Geary Pate, University of West of Scotland, ‘Sexism and chauvinism in journalism: experiences of women journalists across five decades.’  (Presented by Jenny McKay on Amanda's behalf.) 12.30 Lunch 1.30    Angela Phillips, ‘Early campaigns against sexism in the media.’ 1.45 - 3.30 ‘Journalism and sexism: higher education perspectives.’ Panel-led discussion chaired by Jonathan Hewett, City University. Contributors include: Suzanne Franks and...
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A training day for new hackademics?

The AJE Committee is seeking views on holding a training day aimed at journalists looking to find work lecturing and those in the first few years of teaching. It is in the very early stages of planning, but we are keen to establish if there is demand for such an event. It is likely there would be sessions on getting into teaching, university structures and education jargon, assessment, research, planning teaching etc. So if you have colleagues that don't know the difference between their summative and formative assessment methods and think the NSS is a rival to CNN, why not mention this to them? The event would be promoted to practising journalists and among early career AJE members. If you would like to attend the event, would like to contribute to the day as a speaker or simply think it is a great / terrible idea - please email the website editor and he will forward messages to the Committee. Email: theajeuk@gmail.com    ...
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Call for Papers – AJE Spring Seminar – January 9, 2015.

Call for Papers – AJE Spring Seminar – January 9, 2015.

Journalism and sexism will be the topic for the AJE Spring Seminar - January 9, 2015, in London. [IMAGE: Flickr /Eric E Castro]    Details: January 9, 2015 London campus of Sunderland University in Canary Wharf 10am till 4pm (tbc). Keynote speakers (tbc).   Journalism and sexism There can be little doubt that the journalism we read offers rich source of material for anyone who seeks evidence that sexism still flourishes in 2014. Newspapers and magazines and their related websites are all guilty. The same is true of the journalism profession. Even though working conditions have improved for women journalists over the past 30 or so years few could argue that they and their ideas are treated in the same way as men. In this Spring seminar we hope to look at some of the evidence for this assertion and to think about why it should still be the case while considering what we, as journalism educators, can do to improve the situation. What should we tell our...
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