Help us to improve this site – take a short survey

Help us to improve this site – take a short survey

The website editor is planning a design overhaul of this site and the AJE's social media communication. We are keen to hear the views of members and users of the site and are launching a quick survey. [Image credit: Flickr / spike55151] Take the five minute survey now! How could we improve it? What sections would you like to see added? Do you like your news via Twitter or perhaps you prefer Facebook? If you run your own blog, would you like the AJE to link to it? The AJE committee has more than a few ideas about improvements which are mentioned in the survey, but we also want to ensure that all website users and AJE members have a chance to contribute their views. Nobody likes taking surveys and we are afraid there are no prizes for filling in this one (sorry!). The only 'reward' will be lots of good AJE karma and the fact that you will have helped to improve...
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Read any good books lately?

The AJE journal Journalism Education is going from strength to strength and developing interest and influence with every new issue. As part of its ongoing development the editorial team wants to increase the size and scope of the Reviews section by inviting even more contributions. The Reviews section aims to review as many newly published useful books about Journalism as possible, but up to now it has had to rely on a small and enthusiastic team of regular reviewers. We now wish to open this out to the wider membership of the AJE by inviting contributions or suggestions, so if you have recently read a new book about our discipline, or would like to order a title from the publishers, your review could appear in our journal. Equally you might have written, edited or contributed to a new book and would like to recommend it for review. You may also wish to highlight a specifically useful text for our popular ‘Classic from the Journalism...
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Fashion Journalism by Julie Bradford

Fashion Journalism by Julie Bradford, University of Sunderland. It's the first textbook about fashion journalism in the UK, and it looks at how it operates, how to get into it and how to do it. It includes lots of interviews with fashion journalists from newspapers, magazines, websites and retail brands, as well as stylists, PRs and bloggers. The book is aimed at undergraduate and MA students on journalism, magazine and fashion courses. The publisher's blurb states: The business of fashion and fashion PR is explained for the trainee journalist, offering practical guidance on how to report effectively on fashion – from sources and research to writing and layout., with chapter including suggested exercises and further reading. Covering a broad range of subject areas, from law and ethics and using social media to fashion theory and reporting the catwalk, this text offers everything a student or trainee needs to know to excel in fashion journalism.   Grab your inspection copy here        ...
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Lecturer in media ethics attacks Robin Williams reporting

Dr Douglas Chalmers, senior lecturer in media and journalism at Glasgow Caledonian University, has attacked the reporting of Robin Williams' death. In an article for The Drum he writes: The details of how he carried out his suicide reported in a lurid manner – sometimes in bulletpoint headlines – by papers such as the Sun, the Mirror, and the Mail are of no positive benefit to anyone. They also run the risk of bringing about copycat actions by individuals who perhaps may feel seriously depressed or have mental health issues. At worst this might bring them to act in a similar way in the belief that this could bring about a personal association with their former on-screen hero.   There exists very clear guidelines produced by the NUJ which outline acceptable ways of covering suicide in the press. It states: “Reporting suicide carries a responsibility for writers and editors in regard to the most vulnerable and exposed members of society. It is essential to understand the serious implications...
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Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Female Conservative and Labour politicians receive more negative media coverage than their male counterparts, while female Liberal Democrats were generally ignored, new research has found. Research by Leeds Trinity journalism academic Deirdre O’Neill and partly funded by a grant from the AJE,  was hailed as an ‘important’ work by Mary Mcleod MP in her opening remarks to an All-Party Parliamentary Group on Sex Equality examining media coverage of women in politics. Ms O’Neill, Associate Principal Lecturer in Journalism, and co-author Dr Heather Savigny of Bournemouth University, were presenting their findings on press coverage of female politicians over the last 20 years, in a session organised by the Fawcett Society. Their work showed that women in 2012 were receiving less coverage in proportion to their relative numbers in Parliament than in 2002 and 1992, and that they were being quoted less than 20 years ago. The research also demonstrated that Conservative and Labour women were receiving proportionally more negative coverage than their male counterparts...
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