Lecturer in media ethics attacks Robin Williams reporting

Dr Douglas Chalmers, senior lecturer in media and journalism at Glasgow Caledonian University, has attacked the reporting of Robin Williams' death. In an article for The Drum he writes: The details of how he carried out his suicide reported in a lurid manner – sometimes in bulletpoint headlines – by papers such as the Sun, the Mirror, and the Mail are of no positive benefit to anyone. They also run the risk of bringing about copycat actions by individuals who perhaps may feel seriously depressed or have mental health issues. At worst this might bring them to act in a similar way in the belief that this could bring about a personal association with their former on-screen hero.   There exists very clear guidelines produced by the NUJ which outline acceptable ways of covering suicide in the press. It states: “Reporting suicide carries a responsibility for writers and editors in regard to the most vulnerable and exposed members of society. It is essential to understand the serious implications...
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Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Female Conservative and Labour politicians receive more negative media coverage than their male counterparts, while female Liberal Democrats were generally ignored, new research has found. Research by Leeds Trinity journalism academic Deirdre O’Neill and partly funded by a grant from the AJE,  was hailed as an ‘important’ work by Mary Mcleod MP in her opening remarks to an All-Party Parliamentary Group on Sex Equality examining media coverage of women in politics. Ms O’Neill, Associate Principal Lecturer in Journalism, and co-author Dr Heather Savigny of Bournemouth University, were presenting their findings on press coverage of female politicians over the last 20 years, in a session organised by the Fawcett Society. Their work showed that women in 2012 were receiving less coverage in proportion to their relative numbers in Parliament than in 2002 and 1992, and that they were being quoted less than 20 years ago. The research also demonstrated that Conservative and Labour women were receiving proportionally more negative coverage than their male counterparts...
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