Two new journalism textbooks aimed at students

Two new journalism textbooks aimed at university students have been published by Oxford University Press and Routledge The Oxford Dictionary of Journalism, written by Tony Harcup of Sheffield University, provides concise definitions for over 1,400 terms. On page 21 you'll even find a definition of the AJE no less: Formed in 1997, the AJE aims to bring together those who train students in the vocational skills required to work as journalists, those whose focus is on the more academic elements of journalism studies, and those who straddle what is often seen as the practice/theory divide. The first entry into this dictionary is not 'Aardvark', but the AAN - Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. 'Zoo', as in the lads' mag published by Bauer, is the last entry in this comprehensive A to Z. The textbook also links to a companion list of websites. Prof Roy Greenslade said it is 'A book so good every journalist will ask: "Why didn't I think of that?""' Lecturers can order an inspection...
Read More

Forget the Future: What’s Happening in Journalism Now?

Ian Hislop and Amol Rajan are among the editors answering questions from young journalists at The Frontline Club, London next month (11 September 2014). The Forget the Future: What’s Happening in Journalism Now? event is aimed at students, however limited tickets are also available for 'old' hacks.  If you can't make it , we'll also be live tweeting @TheAJEUK - so follow us today!   Forget the Future: What’s Happening in Journalism Now? Thursday 11 September 2014, 6:30 PM Frontline Club,13 Norfolk Place, London, W2 1QJ With everyone talking about the future of journalism, it’s easy to forget what’s happening now. Do paywalls work? Is the industry still in crisis? Is it still too white and middle class? And where are the jobs? Grapevine events will be inviting some of the country’s top editors for a night of questions – and answers. The panel of editors will include: Amol Rajan, editor of the The Independent. Ian Hislop, editor of Private Eye. Emma Tucker, deputy editor of The Times. Alex Miller, editor-in-chief of VICE. Sarah Sands, editor of the Evening Standard. This...
Read More

Lecturer in media ethics attacks Robin Williams reporting

Dr Douglas Chalmers, senior lecturer in media and journalism at Glasgow Caledonian University, has attacked the reporting of Robin Williams' death. In an article for The Drum he writes: The details of how he carried out his suicide reported in a lurid manner – sometimes in bulletpoint headlines – by papers such as the Sun, the Mirror, and the Mail are of no positive benefit to anyone. They also run the risk of bringing about copycat actions by individuals who perhaps may feel seriously depressed or have mental health issues. At worst this might bring them to act in a similar way in the belief that this could bring about a personal association with their former on-screen hero.   There exists very clear guidelines produced by the NUJ which outline acceptable ways of covering suicide in the press. It states: “Reporting suicide carries a responsibility for writers and editors in regard to the most vulnerable and exposed members of society. It is essential to understand the serious implications...
Read More

Calling young aspiring foreign correspondents

The Richard Beeston Bursary is an award for an aspiring British foreign correspondent to spend six weeks abroad, researching and reporting a foreign news story, on a fellowship with The Times newspaper. A further award is available for a young Israeli, Lebanese or Palestinian journalist to spend six weeks on secondment to The Times in London. Applicants should have at least two years journalistic experience, be under the age of 30 and have a professional command of English. The announcement of the winners of the 2014 Richard Beeston bursaries will be made at The Frontline Awards in October 2014. The winners will need to undertake the period of travel between November 2014 and September 2015. Each award is worth £6,000 and will be made in two instalments. The Times foreign desk will host the incoming fellow and mentor the travelling foreign correspondents. For more: Richard Beeston Bursary [PDF]    ...
Read More
Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Academics present research on female politicians in the press to MPs at Parliament

Female Conservative and Labour politicians receive more negative media coverage than their male counterparts, while female Liberal Democrats were generally ignored, new research has found. Research by Leeds Trinity journalism academic Deirdre O’Neill and partly funded by a grant from the AJE,  was hailed as an ‘important’ work by Mary Mcleod MP in her opening remarks to an All-Party Parliamentary Group on Sex Equality examining media coverage of women in politics. Ms O’Neill, Associate Principal Lecturer in Journalism, and co-author Dr Heather Savigny of Bournemouth University, were presenting their findings on press coverage of female politicians over the last 20 years, in a session organised by the Fawcett Society. Their work showed that women in 2012 were receiving less coverage in proportion to their relative numbers in Parliament than in 2002 and 1992, and that they were being quoted less than 20 years ago. The research also demonstrated that Conservative and Labour women were receiving proportionally more negative coverage than their male counterparts...
Read More